Black salt

black_salt_kostrova_2

Seems that it has become fashionable in the expat community, and the question of where to find made it to the list of “top 5000”.

black_salt_kostrova_1

It pops up all over the place in an unpredictable manner but you will **always** find it in the Old Believers shop at Rogozhsky Poselok 35(?).

It is next door to the Old Believers cafe which is open to the public regardless of faith and is highly recommended (a) for Russian food properly understood and (b)as a place that turns near-totally vegan Wednesdays, Fridays, and during other periods, usually preceding celebrations.

Recommended for fresh vegetables or soup of light/yellowish colour **after** it’s been poured into plates both as seasoning and decoration. Milder than regular salt.


Comments

Black salt — 2 Comments

  1. Cool thing! Recommended by true Old Believers to those who have not yet seen the Light : )
     
    We are looking for a good – preferably local – source of unrefined sugar for our store. Any hints?

    Editor of Old Believer site for the youth
    http://www.molodoj.ru
    Oleg

    • PS. Thought I’d explain about sugar. The most orthodox of Old Believers do not use white sugar during periods of fasting because charcoal made of bones are used to make it white. Brown sugar is OK though.

      My great grandmother used to eat only traditional sugar obtained by boiling water away from sweet fruits. During the USSR days fruit sugar was referred to as “pomadka kievskaya”.

      Sometimes unrefined sugar (without bone charcoal) of graying colour would come in large blocks. One would use special pincers to break small pieces form his head of sugar.

      DOES ANYBODY KNOW OF A SOURCE OF FRUIT SUGAR OR CRUDE UNREFINED SUGAR? PLEASE SHARE!

Something to add?