Metro station names

And easy way to learn them: altmetromap.com. Kitay-Gorod becomes “Kid eye go red”, Sretensky Bulvar “Straight in sky bull wire” etc.

There are also maps where arbitrary names are changed to those derived from common words, eg. Tushinskaya >> Tushka (body of a small slaughtered animal), Kitay-Gorod >> China Town, Yasenevo >> Nikhuyasenevo (what a fuck +adjective ending).

Eating at the water pumps factory

This stolovaya is one of the starts of my Recommended list. Still there, still “Soviet”. The sign “Stolovaya” literally means “a place with tables” (стол/stol is table, related to English “stall”). No “business lunches”, “happy hours” or other marketing tricks. Just a place to eat, which is a welcome relief in Moscow, where at least 20% of active population are “marketologists”, and finding a product not accompanied by informational clutter is unusual. Prices are a tiny bit higher than in my 2010 review but food is just as 70s and 80s as before, and 300R ($10) will still get you full.

Metro Alexeyevskaya. When in the area ask for Ulitsa Novoalexeyevskaya and “Zavod Vodopribor” (“Plant WaterDevice”).


That’s the factory. Typical 1880s industrial construction.

Related:

Renting an apartment near Metro Alexeyevskaya. Available Summer 2013 and possibly after that.

Categories > Neighbourhoods > Alexeyevskaya in this Guide

Russian bride seekers: try this travel companion site

Russian bride seekers may want to try this travel companion resource: http://www.poputchik.ru/  It is in Russian but my help of course is available.

As I said before and will keep on repeating, excessively direct approach has its limitations. To put it mildly. Instead, create a situation that makes its easy for Fate to work. Socialize. Offering or asking for a ride is one of many things you can try.


 

Russian micro-lesson:

Poputchik“ translates as “travel companion”. It consists of prefix “po” that has “together” among its meanings, “put” (“way”), and suffix “chik”, equivalent to English “-er” (traveller, player). You already know “put” from “Sputnik” (that thing that went up in flame and smoke in 1957). It was called “Sputnin” because it shares way (“put”) with earth. You know “chik” from “apparatchik”. And “po” from “pogrom” except in this case “po” implies completion, not proximity. So it turns out “poputchik” is an almost familiar word to an English speaker.

In Russian it is “попутчик”. Let’s look at the letters. Letters too should not be total strangers. П is Greek Π (pi), У formed from OU (just imagine O and U fusing to make first U with an appendage like Ц, and then this appendage growing to make modern Russian У. Т is T. Ч comes form Hebrew צ (tsade), И is again Greek  Ηη (related to Latin Hh, both of which come from Phoenician Het. K of course is same as in English.

Easy?  That’s one of the approaches use in my teaching of language. Recognized what’s already familiar. Put  an effort into leaning to access what you already know before forcing yourself to commit things to memory. 

Old bibles and lives of saints

The most impressive collection of old bibles I’ve ever seen is in the Old Believers “Knizhnaya Lavka” (“book bench”) by the Preobrazhensky market.  A small room stacked to the ceiling with books that are oozing with sanctity but can be purchased at prices that, given their age, appear more than reasonable. Probably in Old Slavonic. No, I didn’t dare to ask to inspect them closer. Doing so out of motivation that is 2/3 curiosity appeared to me something of a sacrilege.  A property next door to the market itself, just west from it. The entrance is from the side closest to Metro Preobrazhenskaya.

While there check out a flea market of the 90s sort. Last observed in December 2012 and is note likely to last in the sterility-obsessed 2013 Moscow. You may also want to visit an old cemetery on the other side of the market. And of course the market itself, which will be mentioned a lot in this Guide.

Some Russophilia links for balance

DISCLAIMER. LINKS TO RUSSOPHOBIA RESOURCES ARE GIVEN FOR THEIR INFORMATIONAL VALUE ONLY, AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT OR EXPRESSED MY VIEW OR OPINIONS. IN FACT, TO PROVE THAT I’M SCARED SHI NOT ON THE WRONG SIDE, HERE ARE SOME RUSSOPHILIA LINKS:

  • http://russophilia.wordpress.com/ – A blog by a Russian teacher who professes her love for the country and its language because they have “soul”. I personally have some difficulty seeing “soul” here, especially at this moment, having been a witness, 20 minutes ago, of militsia men chasing away babushkas trying to sell their possessions for a few kopecks without a license. I hope our esteemed Russian teacher comes up with something more convincing then the “kind soul” line.
  • http://www.carnegieendowment.org/2001/01/01/against-russophobia/iv7 – This long anti-Russophobia article on the site of the Carnegie Foundation.  Note that is is dated with 2001. Now the same organizations presents almost diametrally opposed opinions.
  • The official Government of Russia site. Can’t go wrong with this one.

To prove that I’m a ready ass li  a loyal citizen who loves the regime I’ll even give you a link to the official site of North Korea, a place that exemplifies where Russia seems to be drifting. Here >>